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  1. #1
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    Question Confused

    My little girl is a year old and has started eating dog pooh. She is healthy and has a good appetite,very active and playful. She has never been kenneled. I am confused at why she does this as she is very well cared for. I have 7 dogs and she is the only one that does this. What do I do????






  2. #2
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    Coprophagy is the technical word for when a dog eats his own stool.

    The exact cause is still being debated. There are a few theories though;

    Coprophagy can be caused when a dog is stressed from a move, or frustrated or anxious. If a dog has been left alone for many hours at a time, for example, he could become irritated and take his frustration out by eating his waste.

    Extreme hunger, combined with an unclean cage could lead the puppy to eat his stool.

    It can also be caused if the puppy has a digestive enzyme deficiency (this is apparently quite rare and usually NOT the cause).

    Another theory is that coprophagy is a trait passed down over many years.

    It is thought by some that the dog's cousins, the wolves and coyotes, may eat feces if food is in very short supply.

    But, who knows for sure.

    The best way to prevent the problem of course, is to keep yards and kennels free of feces. (not always easy or practical though).

    A popular method to prevent coprophagy is to add meat tenderizer or pineapple juice to your puppy ’s food. The puppy will be deterred by the distasteful addition.

    Alternatively, you could try one of the several products on the market. Others may be able to offer suggestions of products they have tried?

    The general idea here is that certain "products" are added to the food of the animal whose feces are being eaten.

    The product is the going to be digested by the animal, resulting in giving the feces a very BAD TASTE.

    If that doesn't solve the problem, go outside with your dog and pick up his stool immediately after he defecates.

    If you happen to catch your dog in the act of eating, say NO and remove him from the feces.

    Consider giving your dog 5 minutes time out locked up whenever you catch him/her in the act. Then, clean it up.

    Also, ensure you dog is getting a balanced diet.

    In situations in which the behavior may be linked to stress, the cause of stress should be eliminated or at least reduced.




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    Thank you

    Thanks for the advice. My little girl is fed twice a day,Natural Balance small bites-duck and potato. Also gets a tablespoon of IAMS puppy,beef and chicken. I know she is not hungry. As far as stress,she gets a lot of love and attention and other than having 6 playmates,our home is dog ruled and pretty stress free. They have a big back yard to run in at will and do their "duties." I picked up a vitamin like tablet called ProPet stool eating preventive and started her on it last night. Here's hoping .....it has garlic in it.





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    I came across this medical website re: Garlic for dogs...... Below is info from the site.....

    Garlic for Dogs - How Much and How Often?
    According to Gregory Tilford, (author of All You Ever Wanted to Know About Herbs for Pets), dogs can quite safely consume 1/8 teaspoon of garlic powder per pound of food 3 to 4 times a week.

    Dr. Martin Goldstein (author of The Nature of Animal Healing) recommends adding garlic to home-made pet food and he himself feeds garlic to his own cats and dogs on a regular basis.

    Dr. Pitcairn (author of The Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats) recommends the following amount of fresh garlic for dogs, according to their size:

    10 to 15 pounds - half a clove
    20 to 40 pounds - 1 clove
    45 to 70 pounds - 2 cloves
    75 to 90 pounds - 2 and a half cloves
    100 pounds and over - 3 cloves

    Dr. Messonnier (author of The Natural Vet's Guide to Preventing and Treating Cancer in Dogs) recommends one clove of fresh garlic per 10 to 30 pounds of weight a day to boost the immune system and cancer prevention.

    As with most herbs, at least one to two days off per week or a periodic week off from garlic is a good idea.

    How often are you giving your dog the ProPet tablet?





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    I give the tablet once in the morning every day. Toree,my little girl,is a sleeve peke (4 pounds) . It seems to be working...she hasn't been eating her stool. As soon as this nasty habit is broken I will discontinue using the tablets.




    Last edited by luvpekes; 04-12-2010 at 04:38 PM.

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    What are you feeding her? Our dog had a propensity for the same, so I began reading vet school research on this topic. There appears to be a possible link to taurine, or more accurately a lack thereof, in the diet. Dogs need meat in their diet to produce taurine, so you might want to check the label on your dog food if you're feeding her commercial food. The lack of taurine is not all inclusive as respects a cause, but it certainly is something you might want to check into. We changed our dog's food (now use Orijen) and the behavior stopped immediately.





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