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Thread: Help my 8 month old male yorkie has seperation anxiety!

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    Unhappy Help my 8 month old male yorkie has seperation anxiety!

    Hi everyone! I'm new to this forum and need help with my 8 month old male yorkie. He is an absolute doll! I just got him from the breeder a month ago and he is very socialized and good with everyone including children. He is very small, 4lbs, and is as I've read on other's threads a picky eater. Doesn't even like the Royal Canine for Yorkies. I have to throw the bits across the floor and make a game of it in order to get him to eat.
    But the real and only problem I have with him so far is that I can't leave him alone. He is fine in his kennel or playpen as long as he knows I'm still at home. No barking or crying but the minute I leave the house where he can't hear me for more than a few minutes he begins to lick and chew at the bars of the kennel door. He does this to the extent that he drools so profusly that if I'm gone for more than 30 minutes when I return he is soaked with his own saliva from mouth to chest to his little front feet. I don't mind it and just wash and dry him off. But I'm concerned for his teeth and tong. I also notice that he seems congested and coughs for a while after...might be all the crying that goes along with the chewing and licking.
    I feel bad because he spends every waking hour with me as I work from home and has become very attached. I even take him in the car when I go out but just can't take him "every where"
    He came from a lovely home where he was with his sisters and mother untill he came to me. Help anyone...






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    Administrator jude09's Avatar
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    hello hope you don't mind me moving this topic into a much suitable category




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    We had a little bit of a problem with this with our 4 month old puppy. Of course it wasn't as serious as yours but this is what we did that seemed to solve it.
    If he's just in from a walk or is tired/ready for a nap, let him in his crate and stay in the same room quietly until he is fast asleep. Then go and stand outside the room and be very quiet, if he stays asleep this is good. Gradually work your way outside the house, being very quiet. When you are outside, stand quietly for a couple of minutes and listen to see if you hear him barking or crying. If it is still silent, come back inside and be by him again. Work up your time outside gradually so he can get used to it. Also, I find it helps if you can build a little "quiet time" into his routine every day so he will have some time to be alone and not be with you all the time. Thanks and I hope this helps!





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    Start leaving for just a few minutes at a time and gradually increase this time away. Do not make a big production of you leaving...your dog should see you go out and come back in. However, when you first walk back in ... do not make a big production especially if your dog is overly excited to see you (which they will be)....first - put down your things and when your dog is quiet...Praise...Touch...Treat...in that order.

    I have always done it this way and my little gal has never exhibited any "Separation Anxiety". We have taken numerous classes where I went out of sight, and because she saw me leave and come back each time she was fine with it.





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    Hi,
    My cocker was rescued about 6 months ago at 18months and initially he had the same problem. I bought him a kong which is great! I stuff it with peanut butter the night before , put it in the freezer so that it can freeze. When I'm about too leave in the morinig, I put him in his room and give him his kong. He's so busy licking and trying to get the peanut butter, he doesn't realize I'm gone. By the time he realizes , he's ok. The idea is to get your dog's mind off of you leaving. Also don't go to him right away when you get home, I know it's hard because they are so cute. They do have small kongs for smaller dogs, this is also a good chew toy.





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    Yes! Every dog should have a Kong. I also do the peanut butter the night before and freeze it.

    Also... there are many different "interactive toys" out there that hold treats, that the dog has to problem-solve to retrieve the treat. I keep several different ones and alternate, so when I do have to leave my dog... she gets excited to see what "interactive treat dispensing toy" she is going to get. She kisses me good-bye and/or waves, and heads to her toy on her blanket.





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    Hi ... have you thought about making a cd recording of your voice (talking to him, singing, reading, whatever) & letting it play while you're gone? Something that I did was get a copy of the cd "Through A Dog's Ear". You can Google "Through A Dog's Ear cd" and get several locations. The one I have is Music to Calm Your Canine Companion but I didn't realize there was a whole series of cd's.

    I have it in my cd slot on my pc & have it playing most of the time I'm working. All my dogs are usually wherever I am so they are used to the music & usually sleep; they are all definitely calm & peaceful whatever they're doing. I use it in the car when I have any of them with me (even my cat when he goes to the vet).

    Two of my dogs have anxiety issues when I leave so I started them getting used to the music while they're all with me, then I'd calmly walk in & out of the room until they stopped following me out. After awhile I'd walk out of the house for very short trips (to the mailbox, to the car & back, etc). Once they got used to that I'd tell them that I had to do some errands & would be right back, staying gone a bit longer each time. I do rescue work so sometimes I'm gone all day. While talking to them you need to visualize everything you're saying. Our pets are "so" tuned in to our emotions, thoughts, body language & spirits, they know if we're saying one thing & feeling or thinking something else. If you'll be gone until mealtime, visualize returning & then fixing his meal.

    Speaking of his meals, since you work from home have you ever thought about fixing his meals instead of buying commercial dog food? The health of my dogs have improved so much since I quit giving commercial food. They love fresh food, it's healthier, has no preservatives or additives, hasn't been sitting in a warehouse, transported across the country & sitting on a grocery shelf for who knows how long. I know exactly what is in the food they eat & can quickly change the diet if they become ill for some reason (allergies, urinary infection, diarrhea, etc). Just a thought.

    Another thing that has helped several foster dogs is putting a couple drops of Rescue Remedy in the drinking water. It is an herbal product, totally natural, non-toxic & I use it for everything. When I have a new foster I'll put 2 drops in the drinking water every day. All the dogs drink from the same water bowls & the RR is safe for all of them. It helps everyone work through the household change & helps the new baby calm down so he can learn what love is all about.

    Good luck with your new baby, I know how hard it is to leave them alone. Jodi





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    Outstanding post...luv4paps. I've heard all great things about the CD. Every dog owner should own one. Be sure the Rescue Remedy is alcohol free.





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    toy poodle separation anxiety

    I have a toy poodle that I got from a breeder about a year ago, so she is a little over a year old. She's the sweetest dog and very friendly towards people and dogs. I am a college student so she usually lives at home with my parents and stays in her kennel all day and when she's not in her kennel she has our yorkie to keep her company. She does freak out when she knows we are leaving the house and she knows she will end up in her kennel, but she does fine just cries for a minute and then is okay. I'm in the process of trying to adjust her to be comfortable at school with me but she wont let me out of her sight. I have 2 roommates and she wont even stay with them. When I leave the apartment she cries constantly for a while, sometimes even until i return. She does not do anything that could harm her physically when I leave (such as chewing on the cage door or scratching at things) but I dont want her to be so attached that she goes into a panic when I leave for class.

    Is this something she will probably grow out of once she becomes fully comfortable with her new home and new company (my roommates) or would it help to have her another "friend" like she has at home. I love her to death and want nothing more than to have her at school with me but I dont want her to be miserable when I have to leave.





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    A dog that is overly attached to his owner will find periods of separation very difficult. She has no way of knowing how long you will be gone, or whether you will ever come back. Teaching your dog to be more independent will help her cope with any period of absence in a much more confident way.

    You will make things much worse for the dog if you make a big fuss when you leave. Don't say: "See you later. I won't be long, I promise!" while fondling your dog's ears. Instead, keep it low-key, withdrawing your attention from your dog 20 minutes before you leave. Keep it low-key when you return, as well. Don't say: "Oh! Did you miss me?" as she jumps all over you. Instead, show her that your return is no big deal. You were out, and now you're back.

    Leave her in a dog-proofed area with some interactive toys and other things to keep her busy. Cubes that you can stuff with treats will keep her occupied for quite a while.

    Dogs are very sensitive to changes in their environment. You can do a great deal to ease the stress of your absence by managing the dog's environment. Keep the lights on when you go out. leave the radio or T.V. on. I like to set the T.V. to a talk show or news channel so that my dog can hear voices. Or put on a soothing CD of classical music, such as Mozart, Bach, and Celtic music. make sure you are not gone too long. Four to six hours is the most you should leave an adult dog on his own, and of course, a lot less for puppies, as puppies need a lot more supervision and potty breaks.

    A dog should not be left in a crate all-day long. That is on the verge of animal cruelty, in my opinion as well as a lot of well-known dog trainers. Use baby gates to section off a part of the house when your pup can be free to roam....set out pee pads in a corner for pottying.....have plenty of fresh cool water available, but not the food bowl.

    I disagree with getting another pet as company for the lonely one. If you work on the above....your dog will soon think your leaving is no big deal. My little gal who's 2 years old, has always been closest to me. When she was very young, I would just go out side for just a few minutes, and then come right back in....gradually increasing my time away. She sees me go...and sees me return. I make my leaving no big deal.

    When you take the focus off of what your real intentions are - and you pretend to do something different (like pick up a magazine and thumb through it all the while holding your keys /purse/bag) - your dog doesn't read your triggers. It's a different deal. This should relieve nervousness and stress in your dog whenever you go out.





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